Tag Archives: strength training

5 Lessons from the World of Martial Arts

Bruce Lee Martial ArtsIn a previous article, I have mentioned that I got interested in martial arts. Any martial art besides being an ‘art’ is definitely a solid collection of cool and useful skills. I realized that strength training and martial arts compliment each other very well, and by ignoring one or another, you are missing the whole package. Perseverance in both of these forms of training will most likely turn you into an unstoppable machine physically and mentally.

[NOTE: Of course, you should mix both strength training and martial arts to a preferred degree. For example, there is no point in 6 strength training workouts and only 2 martial art sessions per week if your goal is to become a fighting champion]

So what have I learned from the world of martial arts so far?

Lesson #1: You Are Fragile

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How You Can Benefit from Doing Less Strength Training

Less Strength Training?So this title may sound somewhat misleading and rather close to sacrilege taking into account that Rough Strength‘s primary theme of interest is strength and everything related to it, but there is a reason behind this wording. Anyway, let me explain myself a little bit before you start throwing rotten food at me. First of all, I assume that you are one of the people who are dedicated to strength training, not an excuse-making lard-ass. You have been training for a while, and your body may have sent you subtle signals that you train too much or too hard. You know, pains here and there, injuries, etc. You may have interpreted these signals right, but you may be scared to do less strength training because you fear to lose your precious gains. Well, the information below should provide you with a possible solution. But before we dig into the cool stuff, you should refresh this article in your memory, because this is kind of a sequel.

My Idea

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Strength Training and Science

Strength Training ScienceHave you noticed the domination of scientific research in modern strength training? It is trendy and dandy (and more importantly, marketable) to be ‘scientifically proven’ or ‘backed up by research’ nowadays. The general reading public readily accepts this, and everybody seems to feel the need to get scientific. However, despite the initially positive character of the trend, there might be a downside to it.

What Downside?

First of all, I absolutely love science and the scientific approach. People obviously wouldn’t be where we are if there were no science. To put it straight, let me quote Richard Dawkins: Continue reading

10 Rapid Fire Ideas to Boost Your Gains

Rough Strength Rapid Fire IdeasThere is a whole gamut of ideas fighting in my head every day. So, I decided to pick the best ones I came up with lately and to write an article about them. Everybody loves ideas and lists, right? Let’s go.

1. Confidence Sets

If you are not wasting your training time on useless crap and have worked up to some heavy ass weights in your compound exercises, then you should have been scared to lift that amount of weight at least once. Self-doubt is normal at this point. This is our brain’s self-defense function. Anyway, this is when confidence sets come really handy. Continue reading

Strength VS Skill Training

Handstand in the WoodsHave you ever wondered how professional athletes can train almost daily for SEVERAL hours per day? Well, according to this correlation, it is possible only in one case: they are so strong and conditioned that their sport training is not that intense for them anymore. It is skill work for them rather than strength.

[NOTE: The higher your training frequency and volume, the lower your training intensity should be. Otherwise, you will overtrain]

So, what if you could take this idea and somehow implement it in your own training for more results and fun? Check out what I came up with.

Strength or Skill?

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The Fat Loss and Strength Gain Magic Bullet Problem

So, I received an e-mail the other day from a guy called Pete Anthony. He shared his experience with intermittent fasting and strength training. His article was quite good, so I asked if he wanted to write a guest post for Rough Strength. Here is the result. Enjoy.


Fat loss and muscle gain. When it comes to health & fitness, those are essentially the two things that people want. They are essentially the two ingredients that when combined together yield looking good in the mirror.

The truth is that getting either is really simple. You lose fat by expending more calories than you take in over time. You gain muscle by consistently doing progressive overload, forcing your body to adapt to the recurring stressor.

Despite how bone-headedly simple either of these tasks are, it seems that most people just can’t seem to figure either out. Why? Why are these exceedingly simple tasks so apparently complicated for 9 out of 10 people who want to “get fit?”

We’re smart enough to get PhD’s, split atoms, build silicon microprocessors, and put a man on the moon, yet the vast majority of 1st world individuals can’t figure out how to get at least lean & healthy enough to get their doctors off their ass? What gives? Continue reading

Simplify


The Barbell

The simplest solution is the best one in 95% of cases according to the National Solution Research Association.

Alright, the part about NSRA is made up. However, as my experience shows, simple is always the best, almost magically. These words should be carved in your brain. And they should pop up and block any new modern fad pseudo-sophisticated bullshit clever marketers are trying to feed you with. Any time you find yourself bombarded with “brand new” and “ultra-intricate”, just walk away. All that crap won’t endure long. On the other hand, simplicity is a time-tested concept that works.

Additionally, simple is your biggest friend in tough times. It is that loyal pillar you can lean on unconditionally. It will always be by your side if you can embrace it.

What does this have to do with training and nutrition? When times get rough, you need to simplify. You must simplify. Otherwise, you are doomed to fail.

Let me explain what I mean.

My Routine

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