Tag Archives: handstand

Strength VS Skill Training

Handstand in the WoodsHave you ever wondered how professional athletes can train almost daily for SEVERAL hours per day? Well, according to this correlation, it is possible only in one case: they are so strong and conditioned that their sport training is not that intense for them anymore. It is skill work for them rather than strength.

[NOTE: The higher your training frequency and volume, the lower your training intensity should be. Otherwise, you will overtrain]

So, what if you could take this idea and somehow implement it in your own training for more results and fun? Check out what I came up with.

Strength or Skill?

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How to Incorporate Static Exercises into Your Training Routine

The Only Way to Perform Static ExercisesSo you want to take your strength training to another level. You are certain that lifting weights is not your limit and you definitely need some cool statics like the Handstand or the Planche in your routine. Here comes the tricky part: how to incorporate both static and dynamic exercises into a sound training program without sacrificing too much of a progress?

Well, this article will help you to answer this question.

What Static Exercises?

You probably know and have seen the cool stuff like the Human Flag, but are bodyweight statics your only options? No. There are tons of static exercises you can perform with heavy weights. Let me somewhat classify them: Continue reading

4 Ways to Improve Convict Conditioning System

Convict PressesSeveral years passed, but Convict Conditioning [CC] still challenges minds of fitness enthusiasts all over the world. Despite the fact that it was written and published at perfect time to become a bestseller, CC is as evergreen now, as it was at release date. If you haven’t read this book yet, I’m really jealous. You haven’t got those sleepless nights of obsessive reading yet. You haven’t experienced that feeling of exploration and touching the history of physical training. You might not have that “A-ha!” moment regarding heavy calisthenics yet (if you are reading Rough Strength regularly, then you probably had). Anyway, I think, I gave you enough reasons at least to take a look at this piece. You can find it here.

As for today’s article, what is its goal? Although CC is a full, all-sufficient training system, I just can’t leave it ‘as is’. My aim is to show you how to make it better and perhaps more suitable for your training. But first of all, let’s talk about CC system at its purest.

The Big Six? Continue reading

Wedding, Greece, Handstands and How to Survive All Inclusive

Me and My WifeToday’s post will be unusual (I mean, more unusual than all of my posts). I wasn’t writing for some time for a good reason. If you are following my updates on Rough Strength Facebook page you probably already know what I’m talking about but if you missed the info here are the great news: I got married. Yes, ladies, you missed your chance. I am very thankful to everyone who congratulated me, you are awesome. So I’d like to dedicate this post to the event and all the struggles and happy findings I came across during this period.

The Wedding

My wife’s name is Alina (and, by the way, she’s the author of, I guess, all my photos here on Rough Strength). We were dating since 2008 so the wedding was quite expected. Anyway, I made it all on my own terms and caught her by surprise. Continue reading

How to Progress Effectively in Bodyweight Exercises

Roadside Handstand by Alex Zinchenko

So you are serious about this calisthenics thing. You’ve seen lots of videos on YouTube. You’ve read some articles. Maybe you even read some books (!). But nothing helps. YouTube guys mostly lightweight, articles are rarely well-written and books often lack proper guidance (programming is bad or progression steps are too wide from each other). Most importantly they don’t teach you how to progress in bodyweight exercises effectively. Why? Majority doesn’t have the proper knowledge (we can see this often in street workout and crossfit movements). Others have the knowledge, but not willing to give it away for free. I understand those guys. You spend lots of time studying and experimenting on yourself and your clients. You put literally tons of effort and hard work in. It’s tempting not to give away the knowledge. But although strength training and nutrition are not rocket science (as everybody loves to say), they require individual approach. So there is no point in hiding the data. There’s simply no recipe that works for all. Everybody is different. My current program and diet probably won’t work for you. As well as something that guy in a gym does might not give you the same results as he got (of course, unless it’s steroids (and even if yes, same results are not guaranteed)). Everybody has different goals. For somebody it’s important to have less fat, for somebody – more muscle, for somebody – rough strength. Everybody needs different programming, but the principles remain the same. So it all comes to greed of particular so-called “guru” regarding not sharing these principles. But I digress. Let’s take a look at some common methods of progressing in bodyweight exercises. Continue reading